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3 SCI Bladder Management Tips to Make Going Out Easier

featured-May-12-2021-02-57-27-75-AM

After over a year of staying at home, many people with spinal cord injuries are venturing out into the world. For people with spinal cord injuries, this is the time to refresh yourself on the best ways to manage your bladder when you’re not at home.

 

Monitor Your Fluid Intake

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When you’re out, it’s important to be aware of the fluids you're drinking. Depending on the availability of an accessible bathroom, monitor what you’re drinking and how much. If you’re at a party and alcoholic drinks are being served, ask for a nonalcoholic alternative.

 

Try to avoid sugary drinks as well. This can irritate the bladder and cause discomfort or leg spasms if either of these is consumed too much. Instead, drink water, and if you want to avoid using the bathroom due to inaccessibility, do not drink a lot until you come home.

 

Bring Additional Bladder Supplies

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If you use an external catheter, make sure to bring additional catheters whenever you go out. If you have an indwelling catheter, make sure to bring any bladder supplies that may be needed in case your catheter has any hiccups, such as a syringe to irrigate a clogged catheter

 

Consider Bladder Meds Before Leaving the House

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Many people with SCI take oxybutynin regularly to prevent their bladder from involuntarily leaking. This pill is powerful and can greatly prevent bladder spasms. 

 

A spinal cord injury may make emptying your bladder more complicated, but it doesn’t mean you can’t live an active life. Whenever you go out, make sure everything goes smoothly with some preparation and awareness of what you're drinking to ensure you have a great time.

Topics: Spinal Cord Injuries, After, people, being served, drinking, bladder, refresh, oxybutynin, Monitor, Fluid Intake, fluids, manage, Additional, Supplies, Leaving, Consider, catheters, emptying, great time

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